Margaret Randolph

Margaret Randolph
Margaret Randolph stitched by Jenny

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Monday, 29 July 2013

Hints and Tips for Stitching Over One

Kerri asked a good question on our Hints and Tips page:

She said "It is so great to have such a wealth of experienced stitchers in one place. I am working on Dorothy Walpole and the over one verse is taking forever! Are there any tips when stitching over one words? I am concerned the black silk on the light linen will show through. I am trying to only carry threads only if there are less than 2 threads between the letters. Any tips on working this common area to many samplers? "

Here are some of your answers:

My tips are to always carry the threads in the same area. i.e. along the bottom as if you were writing the letters.  Another thing I sometimes do is back the piece, when framing, with a slightly darker color.  If you have the chance you can always use a smaller count linen or a darker shade.  This often hides threads. 
Barbara G.

Ah, the ever pleasant stitching of letters over one thread.  No real advise per se...I definitely would not carry thread on the back more than two threads.  It's sometimes annoying to start and stop and start again and then stop again, but the results are so much better than carrying on the back.  Just a personal opinion.
Vera

I think Kerri has the right idea.   Try not to carry threads where it can be seen on the front.   I usually stitch one letter at a time and end the thread - when working over on, my eyes tire and I don't stitch longer than an hour.
When making doll faces, I try to put muslin under the linen to hide the 'carrying' threads.   Not sure that would work on a sampler.  
Lelia

(Jo - I saw this on a blog somewhere, one by a professional designer I think.  Anyone recall it?)

When I stitch over one I first only use a half cross. Second I only stitch the words that are close with in a sentence. I end before going on to a sentence that my be many thread between to avoid carrying over the lettering thread in the back. This help to prevent show through.
However I have seen many antique samplers that have show through carry over from the back. I think that you have to remember that many samplers were stitched by young to very young children and perfection on most samplers was not as important as it is to modern stitcher’s today.
The other thing to remember is that stitching is an individual art form in many ways. It only really matters to the person stitching as to how the piece turns out so do what you want and don’t worry about what others think.  If those that criticize don’t like it there are many others out there that will love the piece and praise you for your efforts.
Rebecca

The only advice I have is to just have patience and take your time.  Always try to do one word with one piece of thread.  That way, there will be no threads to show between words.  I actually like over one words!  
Kay Lynn


And here is some advice for stitching over one in general, not just words:


You are smart not to carry more than 2 threads, especially when stitching with a dark color.My method of stitching over one thread came about because I use the sewing method, not stabbing.  It is also faster than stabbing.  I work from right to left, using a tent stitch.  (stitch from bottom left to top right, but because I am stitching the row from right to left, the next stitch comes up 1 thread to the left of the orginial stitch and there is an elongated diagonal stitch on the back)  When I get to the end of the row, I turn the piece upside down and cross the stitches in the same manner.  Then turn the piece right side up again and repeat the process for the next row, (working down the chart).  I call it a double tent stitch.
If you are familiar with needlepoint, it is like the continental stitch, but used in both directions in order to create cross stitches. I call it a double tent stitch.Hope this helps. 
Tommye 

I LOVE one over one and that is the only way I stitch!  I change many patterns to fit my one over one addiction! Just embrace the look and enjoy the slower pace.  I always use a mighty bright lighted magnifier and work mostly in the daylight hours :)
Sabrina

The best tip that I have ever had for over one stitching, is to make sure that the bottom under thread is going the same direction as the top thread of the threads you are crossing....
Carol

The only hint I can offer is to cross each stitch as you go and be very careful to keep an even tension, and use a light hand.  Pull evenly but not tightly.  If your linen is dense, you can carry threads a bit further than if the linen is thin.  Sorry I don’t have any more innovative hints.  (Note:  I am NOT a fan of over-one stitching and avoid it whenever possible!)
Fran

Renee also sent this link which has some lovely clear diagrams:
http://www.funkandweber.com/cross-stitch-over-one-thread/


Susan added this tip in the comments
When you do have to carry your thread, plan it so that you don't carry it exactly horizontally, vertically or on a straight diagonal, because then it's directly behind the holes in your linen and it shows more. If you can carry it over 3 threads and up 1 or 2 threads, for example, the thread on the back is better hidden under the linen threads. I've successfully carried over three or occasionally even four threads this way without it showing through.


A Big Thank You to everyone who helped answer this question.  If you have anything to add which we haven’t covered then please email me and I’ll edit this post to included it.

4 comments:

Kerri said...

I am going to try some of these tips and as I try to get through this section on DW.

A little more practice on 40ct will help too but I don't think I would want to do something like Ann Medd, even though she is beautiful and I am in awe of those who have stiched her. Way to go Nicola!

Thanks for all your advice.

Nicola said...

All the tips were very interesting, I love to learn something each day and will play around with these suggestions.

SusanIL said...

When you do have to carry your thread, plan it so that you don't carry it exactly horizontally, vertically or on a straight diagonal, because then it's directly behind the holes in your linen and it shows more. If you can carry it over 3 threads and up 1 or 2 threads, for example, the thread on the back is better hidden under the linen threads. I've successfully carried over three or occasionally even four threads this way without it showing through.

Kevin said...

Found more tips and diagrams for stitching over one thread at this link: http://www.funkandweber.com/cross-stitch-over-one-thread/
Hope this helps!